Friday, 5 September 2008

The American cover of Daphne


I've just read Rob Hardy's review of Daphne. It's made my day (my week, my month!). Incidentally, he's mentioned that he prefers the British cover. I wonder what other people think?

12 comments:

oxford-reader said...

Ever since I first saw the American cover (browsing American amazon for some unknown reason) I have thought it lacking in some way ... I can't really explain why, except for the fact that it doesn't jump out with a 'buy me NOW' kind of feeling like the English one does. The deep red of the entire cover, coupled with the engraving that makes one feel like one is about to be trapped (not only in Daphne's words but her emotions as well) are elements that work strongly in sugesting that this is a book that will not be lightweight and will take you into an unknown world (it has a quality of the Narnia pictures to it as well, Lucy looking at the Professor's house, or something).

The American cover in contrast, feels a bit less involved. There's the mystery of the gates and the red umbrella, but I've seen it's like before, and I'm not sure I would have picked it up without prior knowledge.

Ok, that went on longer than I'd intended, and was possibly a bit more forceful that I meant too, but I love the English version so much and I was actually quite sad the American publishers felt a need to change it.

Also - I've been planning my own 'review' of 'Daphne' for months now, but every time I start it turns into a gigantic gush ... I'm working on it though ;-) !

Karen said...

I think the British cover does suit the book's tone and content better.

Justine Picardie said...

I love the British cover so much that it's hard to see a different one as if for the first time. But maybe that's not the point -- because American book buyers won't, by and large, have seen the British cover. Or something like that...?

Rob Hardy said...

I don't think the American cover is bad, but I think it says Hitchcock more than it says du Maurier. It suggests a film. But the novel is about books, and the Gwen Raverat illustration suggests that more strongly.

That said, I'll be very interested, if Daphne does make it to the screen, how it's wonderful bookishness translates to a different medium

Rob Hardy said...

P.S. Please mentally remove the apostrophe from "it's" in the final sentence, and add a full stop. Thanks!

Justine Picardie said...

Rob -- your Hitchcock reference is spot-on. And yes, I've mentally adjusted the punctuation. It's so annoying, not being able to edit one's comments!

Karen said...

I love both covers Justine but for me the British cover is what first drew me to your book. I had not heard of it before and I only picked it up because of the gorgeous cover design and what it hinted about what would be inside. So glad I was drawn in!

Justine Picardie said...

Thanks, Karen -- that's really good to hear!

Bront√ęBlog Adm. said...

I do like the American cover but if I have to choose I certainly prefer the British cover, which must be one of my favourite covers of all time.

I'm one to judge a book by its cover.

Cristina.

Blithe Spirit said...

I love woodcuts, so the British cover is my favourite. Plus it stands out i.e. doesn't look like every other book on the table. The American one is striking, but more commercial looking. It looks as if in Canada, it's the American edition that has rights. But as a former bookseller - I'd have been happy to put either edition on the front table.

Justine Picardie said...

Nice to hear from you, Blithe Spirit. I love your name...

Sue Aaron said...

I much prefer the English cover. I agree with Rob, the American version seems more to do with Hitchcock. Too many people see Daphne du Maurier as the author of Rebecca and not much else and that is what the American cover says to me.